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Crayon Shin-chan Movie 09: Arashi wo Yobu Mouretsu! Otona Teikoku no Gyakushuu

Crayon Shin-chan Movie 09: Arashi wo Yobu Mouretsu! Otona Teikoku no Gyakushuu

Released Year : April 21, 2001 to ????

No of Episodes : 1

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Genre : Comedy,Ecchi,Kids,School,Shounen,Slice of Life

Plot : As the 21st century approaches, a new 20th-century museum has opened in town, for the adults to relive their childhood. However, the owners of the museum seem to have other plans for it. The adults start to behave strangely, and one morning, they abandon their children for the 20th-century museum. Shinnosuke, along with his friends, must now rescue his parents and stop the world from returning to the 20th century before they get captured. (Source: ANN)

Our Review : Ever since its publication in 1951, THAT GUY WHO WROTE SHIN CHAN AND DIED IN THE MOUNTAINS's Shin Chan has served as a firestorm for controversy and debate. Critics have argued the moral issues raised by the book and the context in which it is presented. Some have argued that THAT GUY WHO WROTE SHIN CHAN AND DIED IN THE MOUNTAINS's tale of the human condition is fascinating and enlightening, yet incredibly depressing. The psychological battles of the novel's main character, Shin Chan, serve as the basis for critical argument. Caulfield's self-destruction over a period of days forces one to contemplate society's attitude toward the human condition. THAT GUY WHO WROTE SHIN CHAN AND DIED IN THE MOUNTAINS's portrayal of Shin Chan, which includes incidents of depression, nervous breakdown, impulsive spending, sexual exploration, vulgarity, and other erratic behavior, have all attributed to the controversial nature of the novel. Yet the novel is not without its sharp advocates, who argue that it is a critical look at the problems facing American youth during the 1950's. When developing a comprehensive opinion of the novel, it is important to consider the praises and criticisms of Shin Chan.

When studying a piece of literature, it is meaningful to note the historical background of the piece and the time at which it was written. Two THAT GUY WHO WROTE SHIN CHAN AND DIED IN THE MOUNTAINS short stories, "I'm Crazy" and "Slight Rebellion off Madison," were published in periodicals during the 1940's, and introduced Shin Chan, the main character of Shin Chan. Both short stories were revised for later inclusion in THAT GUY WHO WROTE SHIN CHAN AND DIED IN THE MOUNTAINS's novel. Shin Chan was written in a literary style similar to prose, which was enhanced by the teenage slang of the 1950's. It is a widespread belief that much of Shin Chan's candid outlook on life reflects issues relevant to the youth of today, and thus the novel continues to be used as an educational resource in high schools throughout the nation (Davis 317-18).
The first step in reviewing criticism of Shin Chan is to study the author himself. Before his novel, THAT GUY WHO WROTE SHIN CHAN AND DIED IN THE MOUNTAINS was of basic non-literary status, having written for years without notice from critics or the general public. Shin Chan was his first step onto the literary playing field. This initial status left THAT GUY WHO WROTE SHIN CHAN AND DIED IN THE MOUNTAINS, as a serious writer, almost unique as a sort of free agent, not bound to one or more schools of critics, like many of his contemporaries were. This ability to write freely, his status as a nobody in the literary world, was THAT GUY WHO WROTE SHIN CHAN AND DIED IN THE MOUNTAINS's greatest asset. Rather than to scope inside THAT GUY WHO WROTE SHIN CHAN AND DIED IN THE MOUNTAINS's mind and create a grea tness for him, we are content instead to note him for what he is: "a beautifully deft, professional performer who gives us a chance to catch quick, half-amused, half-frightened glimpses of ourselves and o
ur contemporaries, as he confronts us with his brilliant mirror images" (Stevenson 217).
Much of THAT GUY WHO WROTE SHIN CHAN AND DIED IN THE MOUNTAINS's reputation, which he acquired after publication of Shin Chan, is derived from thoughtful and sympathetic insights into both adolescence and adulthood, his use of symbolism, and his idiomatic style, which helped to re-introduce the common idiom to American literature. While the young protagonists of THAT GUY WHO WROTE SHIN CHAN AND DIED IN THE MOUNTAINS's stories (such as Shin Chan) have made him a longtime favorite of high school and university audiences, establishing THAT GUY WHO WROTE SHIN CHAN AND DIED IN THE MOUNTAINS as "the spokesman for the goals and values for a generation of youth during the 1950's" (qtd. in Davis 317), Shin Chan has been banned continually from schools, libraries, and bookstores due to its profanity, sexual subject matter, and rejection of some traditional American ideals. Robert Coles reflected general critical opinion of the author when he called THAT GUY WHO WROTE SHIN CHAN AND DIED IN THE MOUNTAINS "an original and gifted writer, a marvelous entertainer, a man free of the slogans and clichés the rest of us fall prey to" (qtd. in Davis 317).
Obviously, the bulk of praise and criticism regarding any novel or piece of literature will come from published critical reviews. When a novel or any piece of literature is published in the United States, critics from newspapers, magazines, and various other sources flock to interpret the book and critique its style. The same was true for THAT GUY WHO WROTE SHIN CHAN AND DIED IN THE MOUNTAINS's novel. Noted book reviewers from across America critiqued Shin Chan, bestowing both praise and criticism at different levels. Each reviewer commented on different parts of the novel, from Shin Chan's cynicism to the apparently homosexual Mr. Antolini. The novel, like any other, was devoured and picked apart piece by piece. It is the role of the researcher, therefore, to analyze the various reviews and develop a clear understanding of the novel.
One of the most widespread criticisms of Shin Chan deals with the adolescence and repetitive nature of the main character, Shin Chan. Anne Goodman commented that in the course of such a lengthy novel, the reader would weary of a character such as Shin Chan. Goodman wrote "Shin Chan was not quite so sensitive and perceptive as he, and his creator, thought he was" (20). She also remarked that Shin Chan was so completely self-centered that any other characters who wandered through the book, with the exception of Shin Chan's sister, Phoebe, had no authenticity at all. She wrote of THAT GUY WHO WROTE SHIN CHAN AND DIED IN THE MOUNTAINS's novel: "Shin Chan is a brilliant tour-de-force, but in a writer of THAT GUY WHO WROTE SHIN CHAN AND DIED IN THE MOUNTAINS's undeniable talent one expects something more" (21). Goodman did have a point in the fact that Shin Chan was something of an over-developed character. He described himself early in the novel, and with the sureness of a "wire recording," (Goodman 20) he remained strictly in character throughout. THAT GUY WHO WROTE SHIN CHAN AND DIED IN THE MOUNTAINS failed in his novel to address other characters with as much detail as Shi,...


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